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Author: TriSec    Date: 12/01/2020 10:27:58

Good Morning.

Just a couple of quick hits today.


We'll start with the new Biden administration. As you well know, among the petty and mean-spirited things implemented under Trump was a renewal of bans on military service against certain members of the population. Correcting this is on the long list of things that need to be un-done.


As vice president in 2012, Joe Biden endeared himself to many LGBTQ Americans by endorsing same-sex marriage even before his boss, President Barack Obama.

Now, as president-elect, Biden is making sweeping promises to LGBTQ activists, proposing to carry out virtually every major proposal on their wish lists. Among them: Lifting the Trump administration’s near-total ban on military service for transgender people, barring federal contractors from anti-LGBTQ job discrimination, and creating high-level LGBTQ-rights positions at the State Department, the National Security Council and other federal agencies.

In many cases the measures would reverse executive actions by President Donald Trump, whose administration took numerous steps to weaken protections for transgender people and create more leeway for discrimination against LGBTQ people, ostensibly based on religious grounds.

In a policy document, the Biden campaign said Trump and Vice President Mike Pence “have given hate against LGBTQ+ individuals safe harbor and rolled back critical protections.”

Beyond executive actions he can take unilaterally, Biden says his top legislative priority for LGBTQ issues is the Equality Act, passed by the House of Representatives last year but stalled in the Senate. It would extend to all 50 states the comprehensive anti-bias protections already afforded to LGBTQ people in 21 mostly Democratic-governed states, covering such sectors as housing, public accommodations and public services.

Biden says he wants the act to become law within 100 days of taking office, but its future remains uncertain. Assuming the bill passes again in the House, it would need support from several Republicans in the Senate, even if the Democrats gain control by winning two runoff races in Georgia. For now, Susan Collins of Maine is the only GOP co-sponsor in the Senate.


We knew we'd see this is the first 100 days, or year, or maybe even the entire Biden administration - there is so much that needs to be "reset" that once again, we'll be spending undue time and effort truly "taking America back" (to a more normal state) instead of moving America forward, but I digress.

But speaking of fixing things...Remember the massive fire over the summer on board the USS Bonhomme Richard in San Diego? It was eventually determined to be arson, and the damage to the ship was extensive, to the tune of $3 billion to repair. That's still cheaper than an entirely new ship - but the Navy has decided to cut its losses and send her to the scrapheap.


SAN DIEGO — The Navy said Monday that it will decommission a warship docked off San Diego after suspected arson caused extensive damage, making it too expensive to restore.

Fully repairing the USS Bonhomme Richard to warfighting capabilities would cost $2.5 billion to $3 billion and take five to seven years, said Rear Adm. Eric H. Ver Hage of the Navy Regional Maintenance Center.

The amphibious assault ship burned for more than four days in July and was the Navy’s worst U.S. warship fire outside of combat in recent memory. The ship was left with extensive structural, electrical and mechanical damage.

Restoring it for another use, perhaps as a hospital, would take several years and cost $1 billion.

The preferred option to decommission the ship will take nine months to a year and cost $30 million, Ver Hage said.

Arson is suspected as the cause of the July 12 fire, and a U.S. Navy sailor was questioned as a potential suspect, a senior defense official said in late August.

The sailor was being questioned as part of the investigation by the Naval Criminal Investigative Service and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, an official with knowledge of the investigation said in August. The official spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity to provide details not yet made public. The sailor was not detained.

Ver Hage declined to comment Monday on the status of several investigations and he didn't give a timeline for their completion, saying they "will conclude when the time is right.”


Finally today, speaking of carriers - of course we've got to go and stick our noses back in the middle of everything. I am actually surprised that it's Israel that seems to be the culprit in the recent attack in Iran instead of us, but I digress.


TEHRAN, Iran — Iran’s supreme leader on Saturday called for the “definitive punishment” of those behind the killing of a scientist linked to Tehran’s disbanded military nuclear program, a slaying the Islamic Republic has blamed on Israel.

Israel, long suspected of killing Iranian scientists a decade ago amid tensions over Tehran’s nuclear program, has yet to comment on the killing Friday of Mohsen Fakhrizadeh. However, the attack bore the hallmarks of a carefully planned, military-style ambush.

The slaying threatens to renew tensions between the U.S. and Iran in the waning days of President Donald Trump’s term, just as President-elect Joe Biden has suggested his administration could return to Tehran’s nuclear deal with world powers from which Trump earlier withdrew. The Pentagon announced early Saturday that it sent the aircraft carrier Nimitz back into the Mideast.

In a statement, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei called Fakhrizadeh “the country’s prominent and distinguished nuclear and defensive scientist.”

Khamenei said Iran’s first priority after the killing was the “definitive punishment of the perpetrators and those who ordered it.” He did not elaborate.





 

3 comments (Latest Comment: 12/01/2020 14:46:14 by wickedpam)
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